The Different Styles Of Karate

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Martial arts movies, TV shows and championship matches are embedded in popular culture, both East and West. And, it all started with ancient forms of Karate. Today, there are 10 main styles practiced and each is explained in this article in greater detail. Shobu Hajime!
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Shotokan-ryu Karate

The Shotokan-ryu style of karate “is characterised by deep, long stances which provide stability, powerful movements and leg strengthening. It develops speed, strength and power with a fluid style which incorporates grappling, throwing and some standing joint locking.”
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Shito-ryu Karate

The Shito-ryu style of karate “is a combination style, which attempts to unite the diverse roots of the art form. On one hand, it employs physical strength and long powerful stances. On the other it incorporates eight-directional movements and breathing power.”
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Goju-ryu Karate

The Goju-ryu style of karate “incorporates both circular and linear movements, combining hard striking attacks such as kicks and close hand punches with softer open hand circular techniques for attacking, blocking, and controlling the opponent, including locks, grappling, takedowns and throws.”
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Wado-ryu Karate

The Wado-ryu style of karate “might be considered a style of jui-jitsu rather than karate. It’s name (translated as “evasion”) refers to a philosophy of body manipulation moving the defender, as well as the attacker, out of harm’s way rather than relying on direct attack or prolonged defense.”
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Shorin-ryu Karate

The Shorin-ryu style of karate “emphasizes traditional forms in which the student learns to combine blocking and offensive techniques. Advanced training involves circle, line and floor exercises as well as self-defense tactics.”
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Uechi-ryu Karate

The Uechi-ryu style of karate “is heavily influenced by the circular motions which belong to the style of kung fu taught in the Fujian province. It is principally based on the movements of 3 animals: the Tiger, the Dragon, and the Crane.”
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Shuri-ryu Karate

The Shuri-ryu style of karate “incorporates joint locks, take-downs and throws in addition to the punches, blocks, and kicks of most traditional styles. Its main difference is the heavier reliance on traditional weapons, including the Bo, Sai and Nunchaku.”
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Kyokushin Karate

The Kyokushin style of karate (Japanese for “the ultimate truth”) is “a stand-up, full contact type rooted in a philosophy of self-improvement, discipline and hard training. It’s the most popular form of martial arts in the US and is the style of fighting most Americans are familiar with from video games, TV and the movies.”
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Budokan Karate

The Budokan style of karate is “predominantly a striking type of martial arts. In that sense, it utilizes blocks and powerful kicks and punches to quickly and decisively stop attacks. Practitioners also use weapons such as the bo, the staff and various swords.”
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Chito-ryu Karate

The Chito-ryu style of karate employs “a contraction of the muscles in the lower part of the body to generate additional strength and stability in stances. A twisting contraction of the muscles in the arms is aimed at generating strength, rapid rotational movements and frequent use of movement off the line of attack.” Yame…
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